The United States Trade Dollar

The United States Trade Dollar

The United States Trade Dollar was a silver coin minted by the United States in 1873 to facilitate trade with China. The coin was heavier than China’s own peso, and Chinese merchants preferred its heavier weight. The coins were issued with the intention of being used in China to relieve importers of their problem of their problem of obtaining enough coins to settle their accounts. The coins were accepted by Chinese merchants and circulated as a popular form of currency in East Asia.

The coin was a dollar, weighing 27.2 grams and having a fineness of .900. The coin was composed of 90% silver and 10% copper. The design of the coin featured a bust of Lady Liberty on the obverse, while the reverse featured an eagle with its wings spread, encircled by a wreath. The coins were readily accepted by Chinese merchants and were used to pay for goods and services.

The United States Trade Dollar was a welcome addition to the Chinese money supply, as Chinese merchants had difficulty obtaining enough coins to settle their accounts. The Trade Dollar was a reliable and trusted form of currency, which gave merchants the assurance that their payments would be accepted. The coins also helped to reduce the levels of counterfeiting in China, as the coins had a higher silver content than the coins made in China.

The Trade Dollar was initially issued by the United States in 1873, and the majority of the coins were sent to China. The coins were minted at the Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Carson City mints, and some coins were also minted in London and Bombay. The coins were issued in limited quantities, and many were not released into circulation. By 1885, the US Mint had ceased production of the Trade Dollar.

The Trade Dollar was a welcome addition to the Chinese money supply, providing an alternative currency to the existing coins. The coins were widely accepted by Chinese merchants and circulated as a popular form of currency in East Asia. The coins were also used by merchants in other parts of Asia, such as India, Burma, Thailand, and the Philippines. The coins were also used in the United States, where they were accepted as legal tender until 1876.

The trade dollar was a welcome addition to the Chinese money supply, providing an alternative currency to the existing coins. The coins were widely accepted by Chinese merchants and circulated as a popular form of currency in East Asia. The coins were also used by merchants in other parts of Asia, such as India, Burma, Thailand, and the Philippines. The coins were also used in the United States, where they were accepted as legal tender until 1876. The Trade Dollar was an important part of the Chinese money supply and helped to facilitate trade between the United States and China.

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